Visiting hours: 
The National Museum of Art of Romania, the Theodor Pallady Museum and the K. H. Zambaccian Museum can be visited: Wednesday-Friday 10am-6pm
Saturday-Sunday 11am-7pm, Monday and Tuesday closed. Free entry on the first Wednesday of the month.
The  Art Collections Museum: Monday, Tuesday and Friday, 10am-6pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-7pm, closed Wednesday and Thursday. Free entry on the first Friday of the month.
Last entrance: 1 hour before closing for The National Museum of Art of Romania and the Art Collections Museum and 30 minutes for the Theodor Pallady Museum, the K. H. Zambaccian Museum and the temporary exhibitions.
Between May 22-24, the European Art Gallery can be visited between 12-18.
Between May 23-26, and May 29-31 the Throne Room, the Royal Dining Room and the Voivods' Staircase will be closed to the public. Thank you for understanding.

 
The National Museum of Art of Romania

Romanian Modern Art Gallery

The Romanian Modern Art Gallery tells the story of Romanian art from the mid-nineteenth to the late twentieth century. Representative works by Theodor Aman, Nicolae Grigorescu, Ioan Andreescu, Theodor Pallady among others, illustrate connections with contemporary French painting while those of M.H. Maxy, Marcel Ianco, Victor Brauner trace the contribution of Romanian art to the European avant-garde of the 1920s and 1930s. Early sculptures by Brancusi reveal the master’s will to break away from academic tradition and find a way of his own. 

 

The Romanian Modern Art Gallery tells the story of how Romanian art evolved from the 1850s until the 1970s.

Ample monographic presentations of Theodor Aman, Nicolae Grigorescu, Ioan Andreescu illustrate the strong influence of French painting at a time when Romanian intellectuals were particularly interested in generating a national visual identity. Painters such as Ștefan Luchian, Theodor Pallady, Gheorghe Petrașcu, Nicolae Tonitza and Ștefan Dimitrescu explore the vein of classical European modernism whereas artists like M.H. Maxy, Marcel Iancu and Victor Brauner make a strong case for the contribution of Romanian Avant-garde in shaping European avant-garde of the 1920s and ‘30s. Later generations of artists demonstrate a similarly broad opening toward the various trends and styles that dominate the European art scene for longer or shorter periods of time.

A consistent group of early works by Constantin Brâncuși call for special attention. They are indicative of the sculptor’s strenuous attempts to move away from the academic tradition and follow a personal pathway. Echoes of his preoccupations can be easily discerned in the work of a limited number of contemporary followers such as female students Milița Petrașcu and Irina Codreanu.

 

 

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